Crazy Rich Asians thoughts (by a Singaporean)

This review comes extremely late, as CRA is weeks into its historic box office run in the US, but I thought I’d just share some thoughts on it anyway.

loved the movie. The fact that it’s plot was striking of a run-of-the-mill rom com didn’t deter my enjoyment of the movie; it may even have enhanced it. Because this is the first time I saw a truly mainstream Hollywood with a full-fledged Asian (and not to mention highly Singaporean) cast.

Many western reviews have noted how it’s a fine portrait of Asian culture and society. Mostly, they seem to implicitly refer to Chinese American culture (making dumplings etc), however, I thought it did a fine job of displaying Singaporean values and culture as well, which was such an added bonus for me. Peik Lin’s family was not just comic relief, it was a nice quip at Singaporean’s obsession with things new and shiny, and the antics of the burgeoning nouveau riche. The snarky aunts that flank Eleanor in almost every scene are also a nice reflection of competitive family dynamics in a typical Singaporean household, where a spirit of one-upmanship and incessant gossiping is a mainstay. Of course, these may seem like generic tropes, but I thought they were imbued with a nice, authentic Singaporean touch and were tropes commonly seen in Singaporean films, giving it that added local flavour.

My favourite scene was definitely the Mahjong scene. The usage of such a popular game in Singapore in such a pivotal scene was nice, and I liked how it tied in with the very first scene we see with Constance Wu, where she wins a game of Poker because her opponent was playing to not lose, and not to win. Bringing this concept full circle at the end of the film, (with a change in the game from Poker to Mahjong being a nice nod to Singaporean/Asian culture), she talks about how Eleanor had made it such that any side winning had become impossible. She utilises the game to express this sentiment amazingly; Eleanor technically wins, at first, but then Rachel reveals her hand, showing how she’d given the game to Eleanor, rendering Eleanor’s win unauthentic. Here, we see how she’d played not to win, not to ‘not lose’, but to lose, and in the process had felt for the first time that she was ‘enough’. I thought this had a nice message of how assessing different permutations towards success wasn’t necessarily always the optimal way to grow as a person, rather, considering the value of failure or loss may prove more valuable.

Overall, just loved this film, and watched it three times because I had to. As for it’s Oscar chances, I think it should show up in some minor categories just as a nod to it’s significance as one for the history books, though a nod for Michelle Yeoh may well be possible if the stars align.

9/10

Why Avengers: Infinity War ultimately disappoints

I liked Avengers: Infinity War. One of the factors I’d been most wary about; the balancing of so many different characters and their individual stories, turned out to be a success, as I thought the various plot lines weaves together really nicely, concurrently displaying how far-reaching Thanos’s impact was, with our heroes playing their parts in different parts of the galaxy at the same time.

I thought the focus on Thanos as the main character was well done too; it definitely gave him a proper introduction that previous Marvel villains lacked.

Ultimately, I was disappointed by Avengers: Infinity War because of the widely talked-about ending. 

Since it’s been awhile since it’s release, I think it’s safe to reveal that basically half the characters die as Thanos has collected all the Infinity stones.

When I saw Black Panther, Spider-Man and the bulk of the GOTG cast disappear though, instead of shock I felt somewhat cheated – because we know they’re coming back based on Marvel upcoming announced releases. 

Effectively, the sense of finality and characters being gone for good just wasn’t there. 

I guess I’d expected this to have a defined ending on its own, but it’s instead become a Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1 or Mockingjay Part 1; it’s only half of a complete story; and surely the less important half.

Overall rating: 6.7/10

Broadly speaking a real accomplishment of a film, if brought down only by a disappointing ending 

A Quiet Place Quick Thoughts

A Quiet Place is an amazing movie. Much in the vein of last year’s Get Out, it is an exciting and unique offering to the horror genre, with subtle social commentary at play as well.

Director and star John Krasinski has mentioned that the film is meant to explore the family unit. Upon reviewing the film by memory, I find that the use of sound as the key element to the story certainly gels with his goal.

In any family unit, noise can be destructive, both literally and metaphorically. Arguments can tear families apart, noise from people external to the family can very quickly cause disharmony among the family. The toxicity of all this unwanted noise is manifested as a killer alien in AQP, and we see that the family sticks to the solution of not making any sound.

We see that this too, is sub-optimal; in blocking out the negative elements of all this sound, they also remove the positive; a lack of communication means issues cannot be solved as one does not understand the other; the young girl believes her father doesn’t love her.

It is interesting how the alien is killed, which is through sound, more specifically a frequency that the father had utilized in his attempt to help his daughter hear. I suppose this could be analogous to how in order to truly be in tune with each other, a family must find a common ground, a common frequency which they can all subscribe to in order to understand and appreciate one another. A more far-fetched idea I got was in relation to how it’s the feedback from the hearing aid that causes the creature to experience immense pain – which could translate to how feedback is required from all members of the household in order to foster understanding, even if it may cause pain along the way (as shown by the pain experienced by the girl from the feedback).

Overall, a very very thoughtful and well thought out movie that is engaging throughout with it’s incredibly scary and tense scenes that definitely kept me on the edge of my seat. I thought the cast’s performances were amazing, especially Emily Blunt’s; without sound, they manage to reveal so much about themselves solely through their actions and facial expressions; the bathtub scene was so gripping. Another highlight scene for me was of course when the Dad sacrifices himself for his children through a burst of sound that can be described as raw and primal; speaking to parent’s primal instinct of putting their children first.

Rating: 9/10