Oscar Nominations Predictions (Part 2): Fierce Fights for that Final Slot

This year is particularly chaotic when it comes to the acting races in this Oscars, because precursor awards have been throwing snubs and surprise nominations left and right, culminating in a situation where we find several actors fighting to fill the final spot in the 5-nominee list. Continue reading

Oscar Nominations Predictions (Part 1): Will popular films rule the day?

With Oscar voting having wrapped on the 14th of January, it’s time to finalize my Oscar nomination predictions before they are announced next week! This season so far has been nothing short of turbulent and rife with controversy and think pieces. The created and then removed Popular Film category, the subsequent move to be more inclusive of popular films, Roma and the Netflix situation, Green Book and the barrage of accusations volleyed at the team behind it, First Man’s underwhelming run for its unpatriotic storytelling, the unprecedented inclusion of Asian-American voices to the mix… the list goes on. With many precursors having already announced their nominees, and in some cases, their winners, it’s time for me to consolidate my list of predicted nominees before the big day approaches. In this first part, I present my predictions for Best Picture and Best Director.

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5 Favourite Trailers of 2018

Part 2 of sorts of my favourite in film of 2018… my 5 favourite trailers! My favourite trailers are the ones that affect me and immediately drive a keen level of anticipation in me for the film. To me, the best trailers are as absorbing as a good film, with a conscious use of music, visuals and dialogue to foster the feel of the film. Keep in mind that this list contains trailers of films that came out in 2018. Thus, phenomenal trailer such as the Dumbo trailer, which came out in 2018 but is for a film showing in 2019, will not be included. Without further ado… Continue reading

11 Most Anticipated Films of 2019

In 2019, Disney will release not one, not two, but three live-action adaptations of their animated classics, namely Aladdin, Dumbo and The Lion King. This alone should be testament to how packed 2019 is going to be with films I can’t wait to catch in cinemas. Needless to say, this list was rather difficult to make given the sheer number of potentially amazing films on the calendar, but here are my eleven most anticipated films of 2019.   Continue reading

Fantastic Beasts: Crimes of Grindelwald Thoughts/Analysis/Review

*SPOILERS AHEAD*

Going into the cinema, one of the biggest question marks for this film was definitely the plot. Seeing as Crimes of Grindelwald is based off an original screenplay by JK Rowling, who has been kind of going wild throwing twists and turns in her story world, I was expecting a film full of plot twists and references to the Harry Potter series.

The film started off well; I enjoyed the opening sequence where Grindelwald escapes while being transferred to another prison. I thought the act of him throwing the creature that had helped him subdue his captors out of the carriage to its death was an apt way of displaying how he’s completely contrary to Newt; he doesn’t care for the lives of beasts at all. Likewise, we also see how he’s contrary to Newt in terms of his ability to win people over with his ‘silver tongue’ (I’m honestly not sure if this was an actual magical thing or just a way to describe his persuasiveness); having won three guards at the prison to his side and as we see, has pulled Abernathy over, who was even willing to have his tongue cut off in Grindelwald’s place. Indeed, we see Grindelwald’s insidious pull throughout the film; bringing Auror’s to his side, and of course, Queenie.

After the nice opening sequence, we cut to three months later, where we see Newt in the UK Ministry of Magic. We are introduced to Leta Lestrange, played by Zoe Kravitz, who clearly has history with Newt. Perhaps the almost uncomfortable close-ups of their faces as they converse is a reflection of their former intimacy. We are also introduced to Newt’s brother, Theseus, who I suppose is meant to be something of a foil to Newt’s character, seeing how he’s an Auror, a vocation Newt clearly dislikes, and appears to be a socially superior version of Newt that could have been; seeing how he is held in high regard in the ministry and is wedded to Leta.

Here’s where the plot begins to get messy.

We’re thrust into a whirlwind of urgent exposition as Newt meets Dumbledore (played very well by Jude Law, by the way), we’re given some news on Tina, who is also in Paris looking for Credence, and of the new Nagini-Credence relationship. We’re also introduced to Yusuf Kama, who I honestly felt was a completely unnecessary character who only served to complicate the plot without adding any real substance to it. We also learn of the conflict within the Queenie-Jacob relationship, as wizards are barred from marrying muggles, giving reason for Queenie to turn to Grindelwald at this injustice. Oh, and Bunty. I thought she was a somewhat interesting if also unnecessary addition, who also only served to complicate things needlessly with her clear affection for Newt, leaving one to surmise that there’ll be an arc involving her unrequited love (which never surfaces in this movie; she doesn’t appear at all after the few minutes we see her, perhaps in the sequel?). There’s also the introduction of Nicholas Flamel, who always seems only to appear as a nod to fans of the original series, as he’s mentioned as Dumbledore’s friend in the first Harry Potter book. His role is, like Bunty, rather needless. He seems to serve only as a powerful wizard who shows up in the finale to aid in battle. I think it’s clear an issue arises very quickly in this film, which is that it’s simply way too crowded. The problem is not that there’s too big a supporting cast, it’s that J.K Rowling has set up multiple points of conflict and interest among them needlessly, resulting in an unfulfilling finale where we’re too tied up with all of the various complicated plot lines to really know what to feel about some of these characters.

I think we can tell that the story was meant to have everything lead to Grindelwald; in the finale, the various characters all physically present themselves to him.

I thought the film could have been so much more cohesive if they had removed the Yusuf plotline, and focused on the Newt-Leta story more. That would have made her declaration of love towards the end far more meaningful (I also liked how they made it ambiguous whether she said it to Newt or Theseus), as I thought the flashbacks to the Newt-Leta school days were definitely some of the nicer scenes. Letting the confusing revelation that coiled the Leta-Credence-Yusuf story together take centre stage seemed to suddenly make much of the main cast almost insignificant to the bigger plot, making for an underwhelming finale.

Of course, the main talking point coming out of the theatre was the deus ex machina J.K Rowling throws us at the very end, that Credence is a Dumbledore. Clearly, this is a cliffhanger move to set up the sequel, but I thought it only served to further throw the Leta-Credence-Yusuf story into irrelevance, which utterly confuses me because they had set that up as a climactic revelation and the driving point of the plot.

We are treated to some nice scenes, most of them involving various beasts. I thought the action sequences in the French Ministry of Magic was nice. I enjoyed the Tina-Newt reunion scene, which brought out the peculiarities of Newt’s character in a really charming way, props to Eddie Redmayne for fleshing out Newt’s character so well. As I stated early, I also really enjoyed the Newt-Leta story, especially the flashbacks. Perhaps a biased part of me enjoyed them because of the familiar Hogwarts setting, but I thought they provided a nice escape from the overcomplicated plot that was coiling itself into a mess. The final battle was nice but kind of came out of nowhere; what were those fiery beasts and why are we seeing them for the first time in the final battle?

Overall, it had it’s moments, but definitely very, very messy. This Harry Potter fan is definitely disappointed.

Rating: 5.5/10

Sight Unseen: Mortal Engines

Usually, it’s possible to glean from a movie’s promotional material and the level of marketing, along with other factors, whether or not it’ll more than likely be a good movie or not. A recent example is The Nutcracker and the Four Realms which I recently saw. The badly put together trailers for the film in terms of their messy editing and severe lack of that magic Disney feel already set me up for a subpar film, which it was.

For the Mortal Engines, however, it really seems like one of the biggest wild cards in awhile. While on one hand, it appears to have some of that Peter Jackson LOTR magic; the visuals look grand and beautiful, the action sequences look interesting, it concurrently harbours a familiar young adult aftertaste reminiscent of the YA mania period of The Hunger Games and Divergent. That isn’t necessarily a bad thing, however, the dialogue in the trailer seems far from inspired, so I think a lot of it will come down to whether or not they focus enough on building these characters amidst the CGI spectacle. The scar on Hester’s face is certainly a peculiarity that I think will be explored, probably with commentary on the concept of beauty (inner vs outer etc).

The promotional material has seemed to focus quite extensively on the character Anna Fang (played by Jihae), so that tells me that she might be the scene-stealing character, who will be of more interest than the protagonist. Of course, a film like this needs a good villain and I think Hugo Weaving has a great track record for bringing us villains who we truly fear and react to.

I can see the film sticking somewhat closely to the novel; the trailers seem to point to a rather faithful adaptation, (of course, that Hollywood filtered scar has been a negative talking point) which would mean multiple deaths throughout the movie. I think if they’re able to make us feel for these characters and have a connection to them leading to the brutal climax, this could be a great film, especially with the CGI spectacle to boot. However, if the characters turn out to be wooden tropes, and the dialogue is cliche as the trailers sort of suggest, it could tank the movie. For me, unfortunately, I’m kind of leaning slightly towards the latter; I think the main character will actually be an issue in terms of development and connection, however, a potentially interesting plot, interesting side characters that pull the story along, and a visual treat of the moving cities and their battles should bolster this movie.

Prediction: 7.5/10. Despite a slightly uninteresting lead, the world of the mortal engines nevertheless captivates you, with an interesting plot bolstered by the scene-stealing supporting cast.